Augustin Plains Ranch order released, meetings scheduled on controversial water project

Now in its third iteration, the application is pending before the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer, which administers the state’s water resources. In July, the state agency canceled a pre-hearing meeting. But last week, it released the application’s scheduling order, which includes information about the project and the process, as well as upcoming public meetings…The New Mexico Environmental Law Center represents a group opposed to the plan that includes 85 people and three landowner associations. NM Political Report

Go to NM Political Report for full story.


Posted on 08/18/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Santolina project given more time to prepare water plan

Despite impassioned pleas from dozens of residents, Bernalillo County commissioners are giving Santolina developers more time to provide a water plan for the 21-square-mile development southwest of Interstate 40 and 118th Street…

Jaimie Park, an attorney with the New Mexico Environmental Law Center, who argued on behalf of SouthWest Organizing Project and the other Santolina opponents, told commissioners that if they agreed to the amendments they would essentially be undermining their own ability to assess whether the water plan they come up with complies with the requirements and they would be eliminating the public’s right to provide public comment and testimony because the water issues would be handled at an administrative level. Albuquerque Journal

Go to Albuquerque Journal for full story


Posted on 08/16/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Special Hearing on Santolina Despite Unanswered Questions

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The Bernalillo County Commission (BCC) will hold a special hearing on Tuesday, August 15 to consider several issues concerning the Santolina mega-development proposed west of Albuquerque.

This “Level B” process marks the last time under the county’s Planned Communities Criteria process that the BCC will be able to consider—or the public will be able to weigh in on—this part of largest development ever proposed for the county.

WHAT:  Bernalillo County Commission Hearing on Santolina development
WHEN:  Tuesday, August 15 at 5:00 pm. (To be continued on August 30 if necessary).
WHERE:  Vincent E. Griego Chambers, City/County Building, One Civic Plaza, NW [Map]


“The Santolina developers have failed to demonstrate that they can make their project a reality,” says Juan Reynosa with SouthWest Organizing Project. “When judged on its own merits, Santolina has failed in the courts, in front of the commission, and in the hearts and minds of the public. And yet, Level B could be approved because a bunch of wealthy lawyers and developers say it should. What kind of process is that?”

Issues under consideration by the BCC will include:

- Developers’ proposal that the BCC abandon conditions that require developers to prove their water before they can get Level B approval, i.e. provide a fully executed agreement with the Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority to water. (Santolina is estimated to need approximately 4.6 billion gallons/year at full build out, similar to Rio Rancho’s current use.)

- Two appeals brought by community advocates based on concerns about conflict of interest, improperly admitted evidence, and failure to adhere to the County’s own planning rules. The appeals challenge the County Planning Commission’s recommendation that the BCC approve the Level B.1 Master Plan, and its recommendation that the BCC allow Santolina to move forward to the Level C process without complying with water requirements.

- Developers’ first Level B Master Plan – a request to approve the Santolina’s first 4,000+ acre village site.

The Commission will also hear two appeals brought by:

The community advocates are represented by the non-profit, public-interest New Mexico Environmental Law Center (NMELC).

The first appeal challenges a recommendation by the Planning Commission that the BCC approve the Level B.1 Master Plan, despite the failure of the developer to meet several requirements in the county’s Planned Communities Criteria.

The second appeal (see Part I and Part II) challenges the recommendation by the Planning Commission that the BCC remove conditions from its Level A approvals that would require Santolina to prove that it has water for the project before its Level B.1 Master plan can be approved.

“There have been several procedural issues with County hearings on Santolina,” says Jaimie Park, NMELC attorney for the groups. “Just as we did with our successful challenge of the initial zoning change for the development, we will pursue all procedural issues in court. Our elected officials should not be violating rules for the profit of major developers.”

For more information about this case, please see the NMELC Santolina Case Page, our fact sheet and timeline.

New Mexico Environmental Law Center is celebrating 30 years of fighting for environmental justice for the people of New Mexico. The NMELC’s mission is to protect New Mexico’s communities and their air, land and water in the fight for environmental justice.

INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Posted on 08/14/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Santolina Strikes Again

We continue to fight approval of mega-development west of Albuquerque

In June, we told you about a tremendous victory that we won in state Court in this case: the judge reversed Santolina’s zone change from “Agricultural” to “Planned Community”.

We need you to help stop this juggernaut!
Please join us at the Bernalillo County Commission’s next hearing on Santolina!

WHEN: Tuesday, August 15 at 5pm. Hearing to be continued on August 30 if necessary.

WHERE: Vincent E. Griego Chambers, City/County Building, One Civic Plaza, NW [Map]

Despite this ruling – which voids all of the subsequent decisions on the project – Bernalillo County is moving forward with hearings on the proposal’s Level B.1 plan. Worse, it’s considering an ill-advised plan by the developer to shove the proof-of-water requirements that Santolina should have done during its Level A and Level B phases down to the Level C phase.

 


This is exceedingly dangerous for several reasons.

First, it means that the Bernalillo County Commission (BCC) is making decisions about allowing a new 93,000-person city (roughly the size of Rio Rancho) without critical answers about water supply – primarily where is Santolina planning to get the 12.6 million gallons of water that it will need every day? This question was supposed to be answered in 2015 before the BCC approved the Level A plan. But the BCC ignored the rules so that Santolina could prove its water as part of its Level B.1 submittals.

Now the developer wants even more. Wait until the final Level C process before you make us show that we have water, the developers asked. Frighteningly, the County Planning Commission said it’s a good idea, and recommended that the BCC approve it. And the Planning Commissioners did so in spite of a conflict of interest and improperly admitted evidence (see our appeal Part I and Part II for all the sordid details.)

Second, this marks the last time that we (the public) and elected officials will have the opportunity to weigh in on this project. Because of maneuvering by the developer and County Commissioners in 2015, Santolina’s final approvals will be handled by the County Development Review Authority, which has no oversight by elected officials or mechanism for public input. (Santolina case page)

This hearing is important, and we hope you can join us. In the words of Norm Gaume, architect of the 1997 Albuquerque Water Resources Management Strategy, here’s what’s at stake:

If the panel makes the wrong decision – to ignore water – and the Bernalillo County Commission approves that decision later this summer, the outcome will jeopardize our region’s public water supply, negatively impact local consumers, and affect taxpayers throughout the state.

Read his entire op-ed here. We hope that you will join us and our clients on August 15 for this important fight.

 

Posted on 08/08/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Martinez Administration Moves to Weaken Water Rules

Water polluters look for a final hurrah under pro-industry governor…but NMELC, Amigos Bravos and the Gila Resources Information Project are standing in their way – and we need your help!

Over the past year, Staff Attorney Jaimie Park has challenged an attempt by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) to weaken statewide rules governing the quality of groundwater and surface water. The timing could not be more important, as the Trump administration launches an all-out assault on federal water regulations.  Here’s how NMED is looking to weaken the rules that protect your water…


  1. When at first you don’t succeed, make a new, unauthorized regulatory mechanism that reduces transparency.
    NMED wants to use a nifty trick that it employed in the polluting Copper Rule to deal with permit changes across the board: discharge permit “amendments”.  As stated by Jaimie in a recent filing that, “It is conceivable that the public would never receive notice of any changes made to monitoring, reporting, sampling and analysis, closure plan, containment system(s), pollution control unit(s) and sewerage system(s) requirements under NMED’s proposed amendment. This is because NMED’s proposed “discharge permit amendment” would not require public notice, public comment, and an opportunities for public hearing.”

  2. Ensure that new chemicals are covered by water quality rules…but leave a lot off the list.
    NMED does not include dangerous toxins such as chlorobenzene, phthalate, dioxin, chromium III and VI, glyphosate, lead acetate, etc. Those chemicals should be strictly regulated for public health (see our filing, page 24 for a full list of what our clients want added to the list).

  3. Enact standards that could expose ten times as many people to cancer risk than states that are more serious about water protection and public health.
    NMED is proposing water quality standards based on the risk of one cancer per 100,000 exposed persons. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends, and the states of California and Washington have enacted, standards based on the risk of one cancer per 1,000,000 exposed persons. Don’t New Mexicans deserve rules that are as protective of human health?

  4. Too tough to get a permit to pollute, and go through the rigamarole of public notice and hearings? New: lifetime variances!
    Another Martinez gift from the Copper Rule, this would allow companies to obtain variances that allows them to pollute groundwater for the life of a facility (for context, the Chino mine has operated since 1909.) Currently, companies need to reauthorize their variances every five years. The system that we have on hand ensures that companies work to keep water clean; lifetime variances would give them an incentive to pollute.

NMELC and its clients applaud some of the measures that NMED is proposing (for instance, we like the new proposed arsenic standard!) But ultimately these amendments will do more to harm than help our water supplies and the health of New Mexicans.

The Water Quality Control Commission has scheduled a public hearing for November 14. We will keep you informed as that date approaches.

 

Posted on 08/08/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Commission to Consider Santolina Despite Unanswered Questions

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The Bernalillo County Commission (BCC) has scheduled a hearing on Tuesday, August 15 for the proposed Santolina Level B.1 Master Plan. At that meeting, the Commission will also consider a recommendation by the County Planning Commission that the BCC strip proof-of-water conditions for the development.

The Level B process marks the last time under the county’s Planned Communities Criteria process that the Bernalillo County Commission will be able to consider, or the public will be able to weigh in on, the largest development ever proposed for the county.

WHAT:  Bernalillo County Commission Hearing on Santolina development
WHEN: Tuesday, August 15 at 5:00 pm. (To be continued on August 30 if necessary).
WHERE:  Vincent E. Griego Chambers, City/County Building, One Civic Plaza, NW [Map]


The Commission will also hear two appeals brought by:

The community advocates are represented by the non-profit, public-interest New Mexico Environmental Law Center.

  1. The first appeal challenges a recommendation by the Planning Commission that the BCC approve the Level B.1 Master Plan, despite the failure of the developer to meet several requirements in the county’s Planned Communities Criteria.

  2. The second appeal (see Part I and Part II) challenges the recommendation by the Planning Commission that the BCC remove conditions from its Level A approvals that would require Santolina to prove that it has water for the project before its Level B.1 Master plan can be approved.

For more information about this case, please see the NMELC Santolina Case Page, our fact sheet and timeline.

 

Posted on 08/04/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Rural residents continue decade-long battle against San Augustin Ranch water project

Like Hand, Douglas Meiklejohn, executive director of the New Mexico Environmental Law Center, worries what approval of the application could mean not just for local residents, but other rural New Mexicans.

“The main thing to understand is that if this can happen to an area like the San Agustin Basin, then it can happen elsewhere in the state,” Meiklejohn said. “In terms of the possible precedent, it’s a case that’s important for all rural areas of the state.” NM Political Report

Go to NM Political Report for full story.


Posted on 08/04/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Is a healthy environment a human right? Testing the idea in Appalachia

Do we have a fundamental right to breathe clean air, drink clean water and eat safe food? The idea of environmental human rights is receiving growing attention worldwide, driven by our global ecological crisis. But the United States has lagged behind in codifying these rights into laws and in successfully furthering them.

While this may seem like an issue for legal scholars, it has very real importance for regions like Appalachia, where I work. Coal mining has caused widespread ecological and health damage here for more than a century, alongside other industries such as chemical manufacturing and, recently, natural gas production. Phys.Org

Go to Phys.Org for full story.


Posted on 07/14/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Public-Interest Law Firm to Bolster Enviro Health for Vulnerable NM Families

SANTA FE, N.M. – The New Mexico Environmental Law Center (NMELC), a Santa Fe-based non-profit law firm, has been awarded a two-year, $300,000 grant towards Healthy Environment, Healthy Families. The project uses public-interest law to safeguard public health and the well-being of New Mexico’s under served families.

The grant was made by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle Creek, Michigan.


“Every day, decision makers enact choices that affect New Mexicans’ health and quality of life,” says Douglas Meiklejohn, Executive Director and founder of NMELC. “For low-income communities and communities of color, whose communities are frequently targeted for polluting industries, these decisions often have negative impacts. Free legal representation can help residents more effectively participate in the technical proceedings where decisions about industrial dairies, bulk fuel depots, uranium mines, and other facilities that affect their families are made.”

The Kellogg Foundation grant will support free legal representation to communities working on public health and welfare issues, including:

  • efforts to prevent new uranium mining and advocate for the effective reclamation of toxic and radioactive contamination that affects families in McKinley County;

  • cases to protect water quality and quantity in Bernalillo County, including work to prevent the permitting of the proposed Santolina mega-development and work to accelerate cleanup of the Kirtland Air Force Base jet fuel spill; and

  • work to improve air quality in low-income neighborhoods along the I-25 corridor of Albuquerque. Poor air quality is linked to asthma and cardiopulmonary disease.

In addition to its work on these cases, NMELC represents clients throughout the state of New Mexico. Thanks to the generosity of members and funders like the Kellogg Foundation, our legal representation is provided at no charge to clients in more than 90% of its cases.

“We are grateful to the W.K. Kellogg Foundation for its support of this critical work to ensure that environmental decisions are made that protect the health and well-being of all families,” says Meiklejohn.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF),
founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal pioneer, Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life. The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special emphasis is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti. For more information, visit www.wkkf.org.

New Mexico Environmental Law Center is celebrating 30 years of fighting for environmental justice for the people of New Mexico. The NMELC’s mission is to protect New Mexico’s communities and their air, land and water in the fight for environmental justice.

INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Posted on 06/29/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Santolina’s Request to Strip Water Requirements Challenged

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Today community groups and residents of the South Valley appealed a decision from the Bernalillo County Planning Commission in the Santolina mega-development case. The Planning Commission recommends stripping key provisions that require the Santolina developers to prove that its project has water. The appeal was filed with the Bernalillo County Commission (BCC), which is tentatively slated to take up the issue in August.

The appeal addresses a request by developers to remove three critical water conditions from the BCC’s approval of Santolina’s Level A Master Plan. Two years after these conditions were put into place, however, Santolina still has no Agreement with the Water Authority.

Amended Appeal Part 1  |  Amended Appeal Part 2


These conditions require that, before BCC will consider whether or not to approve Santolina’s Level B.1 Master Plan, developers must provide a fully executed Development Agreement with the Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (Water Authority). This Agreement, along with other details, would furnish proof that Santolina has the requisite water to supply the estimated 90,000 residents of the project.

The Planning Commission’s decision to recommend their removal was made at a June 7 hearing, in spite of a court ruling five days earlier that invalidates the Level A approvals for the project.

In the appeal, the New Mexico Environmental Law Center (NMELC) asks the BCC to defer its consideration of the Planning Commission’s recommendation while Santolina lacks valid Level A approvals. If the BCC refuses to defer the decision, the appeal asks the BCC to reject the Planning Commission’s recommendation that the conditions be stripped from the BCC’s approval of the Level A Master Plan.

“With this decision, the Bernalillo County Planning Commission decided to ignore and jeopardize the regions water supply,” says James “Santiago” Maestas, President of the South Valley Regional Association of Acequias. “We urge the Bernalillo County Commission to finally do the right thing about Santolina, and rule in favor of this appeal for the sake of our communities and our water.”

“My neighbors in the South Valley want to know why the Bernalillo County Commission doesn’t just put the brakes on the whole Santolina development process,” says Roberto Roibal of SouthWest Organizing Project. “The District Court has ruled that the zoning approval for the Santolina development should be remanded back to the County Commission. Why then is the County Planning Commission and the County Commission continuing to have hearings on the Level B plan when they have to start all over for the Level A Master Plan zoning?”

“As Judge Nancy Franchini’s June 2 decision illustrates, the law is on our side when it comes to providing due process to the people of Albuquerque and Bernalillo County,” says Jaimie Park, NMELC Staff Attorney. “As long as Bernalillo County decision-makers allow Santolina to subvert the system, we will challenge them. These officials are playing a dangerous game with the region’s water, and if they don’t bring water into the conversation, it’s a game we all are going to lose.”

Key arguments in the appeal:

  • The District Court ruling invalidates the zoning change for Santolina from “A-1 Rural-Agricultural” to “Planned Communities”. Because the zone change is fundamental to the process, the ruling invalidates all of BCC’s subsequent decisions on Santolina and voids the Level A approvals for Santolina.

  • Under Bernalillo County’s Planned Communities Criteria, Santolina developers are required to prove they have water for the project. They have failed to do so.

  • BCC cannot make informed decisions about the project and its substantial impacts on the region without meaningful water data.

  • If BCC grants Santolina’s request and pushes these water requirements to the Level C process, there will be no review by BCC and no opportunity for public input into the decision.

  • The Planning Commission erred when it accepted new evidence into the record which had not been made public prior to the proceeding. Further, it allowed no cross-examination on the new evidence.

  • The Planning Commissioner Johnny Peña failed to disclose that his wife is employed by an organization that owns property that would be developed within the Santolina project and the Planning Commission did not hold a vote on his recusal.

Appellants include SouthWest Organizing Project, New Mexico Health Equity Working Group, Pajarito Village Association, Center for Social Sustainable Systems*, South Valley Coalition of Neighborhood Associations*, South Valley Regional Association of Acequias*, and eight individuals.

The conditions that Santolina developer seek to strike from the Level A approvals can also be found in the BCC Notice of Decision, dated June 19, 2015.

*New clients, including four additional individuals, added to the legal effort to challenge the massive Santolina project and its potential impacts on water, communities and local agriculture.

New Mexico Environmental Law Center is celebrating 30 years of fighting for environmental justice for the people of New Mexico. The NMELC’s mission is to protect New Mexico’s communities and their air, land and water in the fight for environmental justice.

INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Posted on 06/23/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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East Mountain Residents Battle Water Speculator in Court

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Oral arguments will be held tomorrow in the Aquifer Science water grab case. Residents are challenging developers’ attempts to resuscitate a failed water appropriation in a thinly veiled water speculation attempt. This case is an appeal of the 2014 decision by the Office of the State Engineer (OSE) denying Aquifer Science’s application for 717 acre-feet of water/year (afy) for a purported luxury development in the East Mountains.

Tuesday, June 13 at 1:30
Courtroom of Judge C. Shannon Bacon
2nd Judicial District, 400 Lomas Blvd, Albuquerque
*Cellphones not allowed in the courthouse


Aquifer Science, LLC, is comprised of Vidler Water Co. (95% owner) and its partner, Campbell Farming Corp. (5% owner). OSE denied the application, ruling that the basin has been fully appropriated and no water remains to be allocated. The original application for 1,500afy was filed in 2011; it has been challenged ever since by local residents who are represented by the non-profit, public-interest New Mexico Environmental Law Center (NMELC).

In addition to the developers’ appeal, the judge will consider a request by NMELC (and a similar request by Bernalillo County) to throw out the case on the grounds that the applicants are trying to illegally speculate in water. In their Motion for Summary Judgment and subsequent Motion to Compel, NMELC Staff Attorney Jon Block and pro bono attorney Paul Hultin describe Vidler’s history of speculation, the shell corporations involved in the project, and the lack of a plan on the part of the developers to construct the resort/subdivision. (Under New Mexico water law, after an applicant obtains water rights, the applicant does not need to retain them for the use stated on the application – the applicant can sell them to the highest bidder.)

Background:
NMELC currently represents numerous individuals who comprise Deep Well Protest, North 14 and the San Pedro Creek Estates Homeowners Association which includes dozens of local residents whose access to water would be affected by new pumping.

NMELC and its clients won the administrative case when State Engineer Scott Verhines denied Aquifer Science’s application in November 2014. The decision prompted the developers to take the State Engineer to court. In an unusual move, current State Engineer Tom Blaine instructed his attorney to side with the water speculators in the case. (Verhines was fired by Governor Martinez in November 2014; Blaine replaced Verhines in December 2014).

New Mexico Environmental Law Center is celebrating 30 years of fighting for environmental justice for the people of New Mexico. The NMELC’s mission is to protect New Mexico’s communities and their air, land and water in the fight for environmental justice.

INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Posted on 06/12/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Bernalillo County Planning Commission Ignores Water Requirements

The Bernalillo County Planning Commission voted on Wednesday (June 7) to recommend approval of the Santolina’s request to strip water requirements from its Level B approvals. Developer, Western Albuquerque Land Holdings (WALH) has asked the County to disregard mandatory water requirements in its approval process because it does not yet have a necessary water agreement with the Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority.

At Wednesday’s Planning Commission meeting, commissioners considered WALH’s formal request to remove conditions that require it to prove that the development has water before it can obtain its Level B approvals. The Planning Commission’s recommendation now goes to the Bernalillo County Commission.

NMELC, its clients and allies vow to continue the fight against this ill-advised mega-development.


The decision to consider the request is baffling, given a ruling handed down last week by a Second District Court Judge that invalidates the developer’s zoning change from “rural-agricultural” to “planned community.” The Honorable Judge Nancy Franchini threw out the zoning change on the grounds that the approval process was unfair to the public and a denial of due process.

Because the now-invalidated zoning change is the foundation for the entire planning process, all of the Level A approvals for Santolina are now void.  This includes the Board’s approvals of the Level A Master Plan and the Level A Development Agreement, both of which are dependent on a valid zone map amendment.  Without valid Level A approvals in place, the County cannot proceed with Level B phase of development for Santolina.

In light of this decision, NMELC Staff Attorney Jaimie Park asked the Planning Commissioners to defer their consideration of Santolina’s water request until a valid zone map amendment and associated Level A approvals are in place.

“We obviously are disappointed that the Commission didn’t wait until there is a valid zone map amendment and associated Level A approvals in place, especially because the Court sent a very clear message to the County that its process should be fair to the public,” says Park. “We and our clients also are very concerned that—with few questions asked by the Commission and little consideration given to the concerns raised by dozens of residents at the hearing – the Planning Commissioners unanimously approved this scheme to sever land use planning from water management.” Go to case page.

IMPORTANT READS:

Did you see hydrologist Norm Gaume’s recent editorial, “Santolina’s Water Use is a Ticking Time Bomb”?

Here’s a rundown on how the invalidation of the zone change affects the Level A approval process.

Here’s one planner’s alternative vision for sustainable growth in Bernalillo County.

Posted on 06/08/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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NMELC asks for clarification on Santolina Judgement

Our clients (including SouthWest Organizing Project and Pajarito Village Association) won an important victory on June 2 when state District Court Judge Nancy Franchini ruled that the 2015 Santolina approval process was flawed.

Judge Franchini’s decision reverses and remands the Bernalillo County Commission’s (BCC’s) approval of the project’s “Zone Map Amendment,” which changed the zoning for the developer’s site from “A-1 Rural-Agricultural” to “Planned Community”. This step was required before any other approval steps could be taken by the BCC.

On Tuesday, June 6, attorneys for the Law Center submitted a memorandum asking the Judge to clarify her decision.


The motion, filed with the memorandum, asks for clarification on three points:

  1. the ruling that the Board of County Commissioners denied our clients procedural due process means that both the Board’s proceeding and decision concerning the zone map amendment are void;

  2. because the approval of the zone map amendment is void, the approval of the Level A Master Plan is also void; and

  3. because the approval of the zone map amendment and the Level A Master Plan are void the development agreement also is void.  It seems to me that approaching it that way may make it easier to follow than using quotes from the memorandum.

Go to case page.

Posted on 06/06/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Santolina zone change rejected

“We respectfully disagree with the judge’s analysis relating to the master plan,” said Douglas Meiklejohn, the executive director and an attorney with the New Mexico Environmental Law Center. But he added that her ruling on the zone change decision is a “big victory for fairness and due process.” Albuquerque Journal

Go to Albuquerque Journal for full story.


Posted on 06/02/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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Santolina Foes Get Partial Court Victory

Attorney Douglas Meiklejohn, who represented Santolina opponents in the case, said he disagreed with Franchini’s decision regarding the master plan, but was happy that she struck down the zoning change.

“We respectfully disagree with the judge’s analysis as to the master plan, but we believe that the determination that our clients were denied fairness in the proceedings regarding the zoning is a major victory for fairness in these kinds of proceedings and for members of the public who want to participate in these kinds of proceedings,” Meiklejohn said. ABQ Free Press

Go to ABQ Free Press for full story.


Posted on 06/02/2017 • PermalinkBack to top


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